Green Motors Practices Group

Through the Green Motors Practices Group, Beaver rewinds are simply better.

GMPG members maintain or improve original motor reliability and energy efficiency when rewinding or rebuilding electric motors. The rewind process is strictly controlled and consequently the motor iron losses are not affected.

We are able to offer electric utility financed incentives or rebates when our customer’s qualifying rewinds are meet the Green Motor Initiative’s (GMI) high process standards.

GMPG members achieve these efficiency goals through strict adherence to good repair practices, including Green Motor Practices Group Electric Motor Repairing Specification 2012 and ANSI/EASA Standard AR100-2015

Both of Beaver’s service centres are GMPG members and both are EASA AR100 certified.

 

Power in doesn’t always equal power out.

ANSI/EASA Standard AR100-2015

Program Overview

EASA AR100 assures the efficiency and reliability of repaired electric motors.

It has been proven that electric motor efficiency can be maintained during repair and rewind by following defined good practices. EASA has developed an international accreditation program for service centers based on the sources of these good practices, namely ANSI/EASA AR100: Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus and the Good Practice Guide of the 2003 study The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Motor Efficiency, by EASA and the Association of Electrical and Mechanical Trades (AEMT).

The intent of this groundbreaking accreditation program is to evaluate service centers for evidence of compliance to assure that they are using prescribed good practices to maintain motor efficiency and reliability during electrical and mechanical repairs of electric motors. The program accomplishes this by use of independent, third-party auditors.

Beaver Electrical’s involvement

Beaver’s two locations are the only EASA AR100 accredited repair centres in BC. Both Beaver’s Nanoose Bay and Burnaby shops are accredited.

Scope of the program

  • Three-phase, squirrel-cage motors that are repaired in accredited service centers. As such, the scope of the program includes mechanical repairs as well as electrical rewinding.

Highlights

  • Designed to assure usage of prescribed good practices
  • Helps maintain motor efficiency and reliability during repair
  • Covers 23 categories and over 70 criteria elements (See the Audit Checklist for details)
  • External audits conducted by independent, third-party auditors

EASA AR100 (Nanoose Bay)

Beaver Electrical Machinery, Ltd. in Nanoose Bay, British Columbia, has been approved as an EASA Accredited Service Center by the Electrical Apparatus Service Association (EASA).

EASA Accreditation of Beaver Electrical Machinery means that we have successfully demonstrated that we follows the prescribed good practices to consistently deliver quality electromechanical repairs that maintain or improve AC electric motor efficiency and “This achievement by Beaver Electrical Machinery affirms the company’s commitment to excellence,” said Linda J. Raynes, CAE, EASA president & CEO. “EASA’s Accreditation Program, just launched last summer, offers external validation that the company adheres to good practices by submitting to an independent, third-party audit.”

The criteria for becoming EASA Accredited are based on ANSI/EASA AR100-2015: Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus and The Good Practice Guide of The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Motor Efficiency.

EASA AR100 Accreditation Certificate (Nanoose Bay)

EASA AR100 Press Release (Nanoose Bay)

Saving money with good power factor

What is power factor and what do I do about it?

Power factor is the ratio of real power flowing to the load divided by the apparent power in the circuit. It is a dimensionless number in the closed interval of -1 to 1.  It is the ratio between Watts and VARs consumed (normally kW and kVAR). In an electrical power system, loads with low power factor (such as motors, fluorescent lamp ballasts, lightly loaded transformers, and other devices that generate a magnetic field) draw more current for the same amount of useful power as a load with a higher power factor.

Lagging power factor is penalized by utilities. Low (lagging) power factor draws more current than a load with a higher power. Utilities must use larger conductors and other equipment when their system has a low power factor.

Low power factor appears on a utility bill as a penalty or surcharge normally applied when a customer’s average power factor dips below 0.90 for a given period.

Power factor correction capacitors can be added to a system to correct the power factor and return it to a non-penalty value.

Leading power factor is a situation where too much capacitance is applied. High (leading) power factor can cause overvoltage and can amplify existing system harmonics.

Automatic Power Factor Correction Systems detect the correction required and dynamically add and remove capacitors or inductors from the system to achieve the target power factor.

How does BC Hydro penalize poor power factor?

BC Hydro customers on the Medium General Service or Large General Service tariff may be subject to surcharges if their power factor dips below 90% in a billing period.

POWER FACTOR SURCHARGE
90% – 100% None
88% – 90% 2%
85% – 88% 4%
80% – 85% 9%
75% – 80% 16%
70% – 75% 24%
65% – 70% 34%
60% – 65% 44%
55% – 60% 57%
50% – 55% 72%
< 50% 80%

Where will I see if I have a penalty?

Check line number 8 your BC Hydro utility statement. If your power factor is 89% or lower or you have a non-zero dollar value in the Power Factor row, you may be needlessly paying a surcharge!

PF must be >90% or you will be charged!

Email a copy of your usage statement showing a surcharge to [email protected] and our engineering team would be glad to make a capacitor sizing calculation for you. Payback on a power factor correction capacitor install can be as fast as 3 months!

Shop services capability matrix

Shop Services Burnaby Nanoose Bay
LV AC (Mush/Form Winding) NEMA/IEC, SCIM, W/R & Salient Pole Motors & Gens Yes Yes
MV AC (>2KV – ≤ 7KV) SCIM, W/R, Salient Pole & T/A Motors & Gens Yes Yes
HV AC (>7KV – ≤ 15KV) SCIM, W/R, Salient Pole & T/A Motors & Gens’ Yes Yes
Explosion Proof CSA Certified Yes  
Small DC (≤ 100HP) Yes Yes
Med DC (>100 – ≤ 500HP) Yes Yes
Large DC (>500HP) Yes Yes
AC Traction Motors Yes Yes
DC Traction Motors Yes Yes
Submersible Pump Motors Yes Yes, with test pit
Transformer rewinding (Dry/Oil ≤ 30KV) Yes  
Oil Processing Yes  
Magnets Yes Yes
VPI Plant – 6ft dia’ x 12’6″ deep   Yes
Dynamic Balancing Machine Yes Yes
Full Compliment Machine shop in house Yes Yes
Lifting Capacity of shop cranes including max combined lift Up to 20 ton Up to 40 ton
Heavy Lift Capability by special arrangement Largest to date – 75 ton  
Control panel repair and assembly Yes  
Substation fabrication and assembly Yes

Field Services Burnaby Nanoose Bay
Field Service (Power Delivery) Yes  
Field Service (Rotating AC & DC) SCIM, W/R, Salient Pole & T/A Motors & Gens Yes Yes
Field service (Power Generation) Yes  
Hydro Generator – Onsite Winder/Mechanical Crews Yes Yes
Dynamic Balancing Onsite Yes Yes
Vibration Analysis/Ultrasound   Yes
Thermal Imaging   Yes
Laser Alignment   Yes
Onsite machining & undercutting (commutator/slip ring) Yes Yes

EASA AR100 (Burnaby)

Beaver Electrical Machinery, Ltd. in Burnaby, British Columbia, has been approved as an EASA Accredited Service Center by the Electrical Apparatus Service Association (EASA).

EASA Accreditation of Beaver Electrical Machinery means that we have successfully demonstrated that we follows the prescribed good practices to consistently deliver quality electromechanical repairs that maintain or improve AC electric motor efficiency and “This achievement by Beaver Electrical Machinery affirms the company’s commitment to excellence,” said Linda J. Raynes, CAE, EASA president & CEO. “EASA’s Accreditation Program, just launched last summer, offers external validation that the company adheres to good practices by submitting to an independent, third-party audit.”

The criteria for becoming EASA Accredited are based on ANSI/EASA AR100-2010: Recommended Practice for the Repair of Rotating Electrical Apparatus and The Good Practice Guide of The Effect of Repair/Rewinding on Motor Efficiency.

EASA AR100 Accreditation Certificate (Burnaby)

EASA AR100 Press Release (Burnaby)

2250 HP In-place rewind

Beaver Electrical recently completed an in-place rewind of a large motor for a pulp mill. Due to the size and location of the motor, removal from the plant was impossible. The motor’s function is to grind cottonwood into kraft pulp before being transferred elsewhere in the plant for further processing.

Motor Specifications:
2250 HP
257 RPM
28 Pole
2300 Volt

The motor was manufactured by English Electric in the 1950’s and installed in the mill.
In 1982, after 30 years of service, Beaver performed an in-place rewind on the motor.
After another 28 years of service, Beaver performed the same service.

We are honoured by our long-time customers. Photos are from both the 1982 rewind job and the 2010 rewind job.